Skip navigation

Tag Archives: crimen

Dozens of Mexicans — including police officers, businessmen, at least one prosecutor and a journalist — are asking for political asylum in the U.S. in a desperate and probably hopeless bid to escape an unprecedented wave of drug-related killings and kidnappings south of the border.
Under U.S. law, fear of crime is not, in itself, grounds for political asylum.
But the sharp spike in asylum applications from the areas wracked by drug-cartel violence — and the willingness of asylum-seekers to sit behind bars in the U.S. for months while they await a decision — are a measure of how bad things are in Mexico and how fearful people have become.
“It’s hard. I’ve been doing this work for 25 years. I’ve been a reporter for 25 years,” said newspaperman Emilio Gutierrez Soto, who is seeking asylum. “We had a life there, a house, my family. It’s my country. But it’s not safe for a journalist.”
Between October and July, at least 63 people have sought political asylum at border crossings in West Texas and New Mexico, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. That is almost double the 33 claims made for the entire fiscal year that ended in October. Elsewhere in South Texas, asylum applications are also up sharply.
In other sectors along the 1,969-mile border, asylum applications are coming in at the usual pace.
Immigration lawyers say they believe most of the asylum claims in the West Texas and New Mexico sector are motivated by the bloodshed in Mexico, the worst of which is just across the Rio Grande in Ciudad Juarez and surrounding Chihuahua state.
Juarez, a city of 1.3 million, has seen a record-breaking 500-plus murders so far this year. High-ranking police officers are shot in broad daylight. Businessmen who are not necessarily mixed up in the drug trade are kidnapped, held for ransom and gruesomely killed if their families don’t pay up. Children have been caught in the crossfire.
“There’s been nothing like this in terms of cartel activities,” said George W. Grayson, a Mexico expert with the College of William and Mary in Virginia. “In the 1970s there were guerillas in several very poor southern states. But there’s not been any kind of violence like this.”
Immigration lawyers representing the El Paso-area asylum-seekers say they have never seen such a flood of people seeking a haven from violence in Mexico. Up until recently, most asylum requests in this sector were made by people who said they were being persecuted by Mexico’s ruling party because of their political activities.
Immigration lawyers say they are representing several law enforcement officers and others who were targeted for their efforts to stop or expose the murderous activities on both sides of the war between the Mexican military and the drug cartels.
As for the businessmen, they include a 37-year-old used car salesman who was kidnapped and held until his family paid a $40,000 ransom, said his attorney, Carlos Spector, an immigration lawyer handling numerous other asylum cases, including Gutierrez’s.
Immigration officials would not discuss why people were applying for asylum or what their prospects were. “The numbers show that there is an increase, but that’s all we can say,” said Roger Maier, a Customs and Border Protection spokesman in El Paso.
The federal government rarely, if ever, grants asylum to a citizen of a U.S. ally who is in trouble because of choices he made — such as where he lives or what he does for a living.
Asylum cases hinge on proving that a person is being persecuted because of his race, religion, political view, nationality or membership in a particular social group, according to Micaela Guthrie, an El Paso immigration attorney. The applicant has to prove that his government is either part of the persecution or unable or unwilling to protect him.
“It has to be an immutable characteristic, something so fundamental that you shouldn’t be forced to change, or can’t change,” Guthrie said. Guthrie said being a police officer or journalist usually will not qualify a person for protection, since the person can often find other work or move to another part of the country.
Gutierrez, a 45-year-old reporter in Ascension, Mexico, said he received death threats nearly every day for more than two years as he wrote stories about the Mexican army’s rough treatment of civilians in its search for drug cartel members. He said that in June, men identifying themselves as soldiers ransacked his house, and he was told they were planning to kill him.
Gutierrez headed with his 15-year-old son to a border crossing in New Mexico, about 170 miles west of El Paso. Now he is jailed at a U.S. immigration detention center in El Paso. His son is held in a separate institution.
Spector said Gutierrez may have a strong case if he can prove that the Mexican army threatened him and is likely to kill him.
There are other legal ways to immigrate to the United States. But obtaining a visa can take several months. Many of those asking for asylum show up instead at a border crossing and announce their intentions, upon which they are immediately brought over into the U.S. — and placed in a detention center with no chance of bail.
In contrast, those who sneak across the border, get caught and then ask for asylum are allowed out on bail. “They get more if they come in illegally than by doing it right,” Spector said.
Those seeking asylum also include Salvador Hernandez Arvizu, a police lieutenant in Juarez who was named on a cartel hit list and fled after being shot repeatedly in an ambush earlier this year, said his lawyer, Spector.
Spector said his clients know the odds are against them. But still, leaving Mexico for at least a few months is worth it, he said.
“They don’t have many options and these cases are life and death,” the lawyer said. “Sometimes in immigration law, you get paid to lose slowly.”

Anuncios

Presuntos sicarios ejecutaron en esta capital de cuatro balazos al comandante de la Policía Ministerial, José Luis Altuzar Zamudio, confirmaron autoridades policácas.

El cadáver del jefe policíaco que se encontraba atados de pies y manos, presentaba el tiro de gracia, huellas de probable tortura, con un mensaje que advertía: ” Se van a morir por ratas, el general Escalera y Archila, se robaron mi coca: Atentamente Celestino”

El cuerpo de Altuzar Zamudio, de 40 años yacía en el interior del automóvil Honda, placas DNC8385 del estado de Chiapas, que fue localizado en un carretera de terracería, cercana a la zona de tolerancia, en el sector oriente-sur de la ciudad.

En el narco-mensaje se alude a los apellidos del director de la Policía Ministerial, general Marco Esteban Juárez Escalera y del director de la Policía Estatal Preventiva, Óscar López Archila.

Altuzar Zamudido había participado en los últimos operativos militares y policíacos, contra el narcotráfico y la delincuencia organizada en el estado, que a partir del pasado 7 de junio enfrentó y capturó a 19 presuntos narcotraficantes, entre ellos integrantes de la banda “Los Zetas”, brazo armado y ejecutor del Cártel del Golfo.

El pasado 23 de junio el ministro de justicia de Chiapas, Amador Rodríguez Lozano, convocó a conferencia de prensa para informar del decomiso de dos toneladas de cocaína y la aprehensión de once presuntos narcotraficantes.

La droga fue localizada en una casa de seguridad de la colonia Patria Nueva de esta capital, envuelta en sacos verdes, similares a los que utiliza el Ejército, dividida en paquetes con membretes del cártel de Sinaloa y del “Mayo Zambada”.

Sin embargo 10 días después, la misma dependencia estatal, aclaró en un comunicado, que el cargamento incautado ese día no era cocaína, sino lactosa.

Precisó que de acuerdo al informe de la Procuraduría General de la República (PGR), las aproximadamente dos toneladas de polvo blanco, aseguradas en una casa de seguridad “resultó ser de lactosa, la cual es utilizada frecuentemente para cortes o adulteraciones de la cocaína, éxtasis y anfetaminas” .

En las últimas semanas, Chiapas ha sido escenario de enfrentamientos entre sicarios, militares y policías.

El último de ellos fue el 26 de junio, en el municipio de Villaflores, donde murieron dos presuntos integrantes de los “Zetas”.

La Policía chiapaneca informó que abatió a dos de cuatro pistoleros, que atacaron con granadas y fusiles de asalto, pero dos días después la Procuraduría General de la República (PGR) reveló que las víctimas se habían suicidado en el interior del domicilio para no ser aprehendidos vivos por la fuerza pública.

Late on the night of June 22, a residence in Phoenix was approached by a heavily armed tactical team preparing to serve a warrant. The members of the team were wearing the typical gear for members of their profession: black boots, black BDU pants, Kevlar helmets and Phoenix Police Department (PPD) raid shirts pulled over their body armor. The team members carried AR-15 rifles equipped with Aimpoint sights to help them during the low-light operation and, like most cops on a tactical team, in addition to their long guns, the members of this team carried secondary weapons — pistols strapped to their thighs.

But the raid took a strange turn when one element of the team began directing suppressive fire on the residence windows while the second element entered — a tactic not normally employed by the PPD. This breach of departmental protocol did not stem from a mistake on the part of the team’s commander. It occurred because the eight men on the assault team were not from the PPD at all. These men were not cops serving a legal search or arrest warrant signed by a judge; they were cartel hit men serving a death warrant signed by a Mexican drug lord.

The tactical team struck hard and fast. They quickly killed a man in the house and then fled the scene in two vehicles, a red Chevy Tahoe and a gray Honda sedan. Their aggressive tactics did have consequences, however. The fury the attackers unleashed on the home — firing over 100 rounds during the operation — drew the attention of a nearby Special Assignments Unit (SAU) team, the PPD’s real tactical team, which responded to the scene with other officers. An SAU officer noticed the Tahoe fleeing the scene and followed it until it entered an alley. Sensing a potential ambush, the SAU officer chose to establish a perimeter and wait for reinforcements rather than charge down the alley after the suspects. This was fortunate, because after three of the suspects from the Tahoe were arrested, they confessed that they had indeed planned to ambush the police officers chasing them.

The assailants who fled in the Honda have not yet been found, but police did recover the vehicle in a church parking lot. They reportedly found four sets of body armor in the vehicle and also recovered an assault rifle abandoned in a field adjacent to the church.

This Phoenix home invasion and murder is a vivid reminder of the threat to U.S. law enforcement officers that stems from the cartel wars in Mexico.

Violence Crosses the Border

The fact that the Mexican men involved in the Phoenix case were heavily armed and dressed as police comes as no surprise to anyone who has followed security events in Mexico. Teams of cartel enforcers frequently impersonate police or military personnel, often wearing matching tactical gear and carrying standardized weapons. In fact, it is rare to see a shootout or cartel-related arms seizure in Mexico where tactical gear and clothing bearing police or military insignia is not found.

One reason for the prevalent use of this type of equipment is that many cartel enforcers come from military or police backgrounds. By training and habit, they prefer to operate as a team composed of members equipped with standardized gear so that items such as ammunition and magazines can be interchanged during a firefight. This also gives a team member the ability to pick up the familiar weapon of a fallen comrade and immediately bring it into action. This is of course the same reason military units and police forces use standardized equipment in most places.

Police clothing, such as hats, patches and raid jackets, is surprisingly easy to come by. Authentic articles can be stolen or purchased through uniform vendors or cop shops. Knockoff uniform items can easily be manufactured in silk screen or embroidery shops by duplicating authentic designs. Even badges are easy to obtain if one knows where to look.

While it now appears that the three men arrested in Phoenix were not former or active members of the Mexican military or police, it is not surprising that they employed military- and police-style tactics. Enforcers of various cartel groups such as Los Zetas, La Gente Nueva or the Kaibiles who have received advanced tactical training often pass on that training to younger enforcers (many of whom are former street thugs) at makeshift training camps located on ranches in northern Mexico. There are also reports of Israeli mercenaries visiting these camps to provide tactical training. In this way, the cartel enforcers are transforming ordinary street thugs into highly-trained cartel tactical teams.

Though cartel enforcers have almost always had ready access to guns, including military weapons such as assault rifles and grenade launchers, groups such as Los Zetas, the Kaibiles and their young disciples bring an added level of threat to the equation. They are highly trained men with soldiers’ mindsets who operate as a unit capable of using their weapons with deadly effectiveness. Assault rifles in the hands of untrained thugs are dangerous, but when those same weapons are placed in the hands of men who can shoot accurately and operate tactically as a fire team, they can be overwhelmingly powerful — not only when used against enemies and other intended targets, but also when used against law enforcement officers who attempt to interfere with the team’s operations.

Targets

Although the victim in the Phoenix killing, Andrew Williams, was reportedly a Jamaican drug dealer who crossed a Mexican cartel, there are many other targets in the United States that the cartels would like to eliminate. These targets include Mexican cartel members who have fled to the United States due to several different factors. The first factor is the violent cartel war that has raged in Mexico for the past few years over control of important smuggling routes and strategic locations along those routes. The second factor is the Calderon administration’s crackdown, first on the Gulf cartel and now on the Sinaloa cartel. Pressure from rival cartels and the government has forced many cartel leaders into hiding, and some of them have left Mexico for Central America or the United States.

Traditionally, when violence has spiked in Mexico, cartel figures have used U.S. cities such as Laredo, El Paso and San Diego as rest and recreation spots, reasoning that the general umbrella of safety provided by U.S. law enforcement to those residing in the United States would protect them from assassination by their enemies. As bolder Mexican cartel hit men have begun to carry out assassinations on the U.S. side of the border in places such as Laredo, Rio Bravo, and even Dallas, the cartel figures have begun to seek sanctuary deeper in the United States, thereby bringing the threat with them.

While many cartel leaders are wanted in the United States, many have family members not being sought by U.S. law enforcement. (Many of them even have relatives who are U.S. citizens.) Some family members have also settled comfortably inside the United States, using the country as a haven from violence in Mexico. These families might become targets, however, as the cartels look for creative ways to hurt their rivals.

Other cartel targets in the United States include Drug Enforcement Administration and other law enforcement officers responsible for operations against the cartels, and informants who have cooperated with U.S. or Mexican authorities and been relocated stateside for safety. There are also many police officers who have quit their jobs in Mexico and fled to the United States to escape threats from the cartels, as well as Mexican businessmen who are targeted by cartels and have moved to the United States for safety.

To date, the cartels for the most part have refrained from targeting innocent civilians. In the type of environment they operate under inside Mexico, cartels cannot afford to have the local population, a group they use as camouflage, turn against them. It is not uncommon for cartel leaders to undertake public relations events (they have even held carnivals for children) in order to build goodwill with the general population. As seen with al Qaeda in Iraq, losing the support of the local population is deadly for a militant group attempting to hide within that population.

Cartels have also attempted to minimize civilian casualties in their operations inside the United States, though for a different operational consideration. The cartels believe that if a U.S. drug dealer or a member of a rival Mexican cartel is killed in a place like Dallas or Phoenix, nobody really cares. Many people see such a killing as a public service, and there will not be much public outcry about it, nor much real effort on the part of law enforcement agencies to identify and catch the killers. The death of a civilian, on the other hand, brings far more public condemnation and law enforcement attention.

However, the aggressiveness of cartel enforcers and their brutal lack of regard for human life means that while they do not intentionally target civilians, they are bound to create collateral casualties along the way. This is especially true as they continue to conduct operations like the Phoenix killing, where they fired over 100 rounds of 5.56 mm ball ammunition at a home in a residential neighborhood.

Tactical Implications

Judging from the operations of the cartel enforcers in Mexico, they have absolutely no hesitation about firing at police officers who interfere with their operations or who dare to chase them. Indeed, the Phoenix case nearly ended in an ambush of the police. It must be noted, however, that this ambush was not really intentional, but rather the natural reaction of these Mexican cartel enforcers to police pursuit. They were accustomed to shooting at police and military south of the border and have very little regard for them. In many instances, this aggression convinces the poorly armed and trained police to leave the cartel gunmen alone.

The problem such teams pose for the average U.S. cop on patrol is that the average cop is neither trained nor armed to confront a heavily armed fire team. In fact, a PPD source advised Stratfor that, had the SAU officer not been the first to arrive on the scene, it could have been a disaster for the department. This is not a criticism of the Phoenix cops. The vast majority of police officers and federal agents in the United States simply are not prepared or equipped to deal with a highly trained fire team using insurgent tactics. That is a task suited more for the U.S. military forces currently deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

These cartel gunmen also have the advantage of being camouflaged as cops. This might not only cause considerable confusion during a firefight (who do backup officers shoot at if both parties in the fight are dressed like cops?) but also means that responding officers might hesitate to fire on the criminals dressed as cops. Such hesitation could provide the criminals with an important tactical advantage — an advantage that could prove fatal for the officers.

Mexican cartel enforcers have also demonstrated a history of using sophisticated scanners to listen to police radio traffic, and in some cases they have even employed police radios to confuse and misdirect the police responding to an armed confrontation with cartel enforcers.

We anticipate that as the Mexican cartels begin to go after more targets inside the United States, the spread of cartel violence and these dangerous tactics beyond the border region will catch some law enforcement officers by surprise. A patrol officer conducting a traffic stop on a group of cartel members who are preparing to conduct an assassination in, say, Los Angeles, Chicago or northern Virginia could quickly find himself heavily outgunned and under fire. With that said, cops in the United States are far more capable than their Mexican counterparts of dealing with this threat.

In addition to being far better trained, U.S. law enforcement officers also have access to far better command, control and communication networks than their Mexican counterparts. Like we saw in the Phoenix example, this communication network provides cops with the ability to quickly summon reinforcements, air support and tactical teams to deal with heavily armed criminals — but this communication system only helps if it can be used. That means cops need to recognize the danger before they are attacked and prevented from calling for help. As with many other threats, the key to protecting oneself against this threat is situational awareness, and cops far from the border need to become aware of this trend.

Ingrid Betancourt y 14 secuestrados por las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC) fueron rescatados por el Ejército colombiano, anunció el Ministro de Defensa, Manuel Santos.

El Ministro colombiano agregó que los tres estadounidenses secuestrados por el grupo guerrillero también fueron liberados.

“Fueron rescatados sanos y salvos 15 de los secuestrados en manos de las FARC. Entre los secuestrados se encuentran Ingrid Betancourt, los tres ciudadanos norteamericanos y 11 miembros de nuestra fuerza pública”, señaló Santos en conferencia de prensa.

El rescate se produjo en una zona selvática del departamento de Guaviare en el suroeste de Colombia, indicó Santos.

“Seguiremos trabajando en la liberación de los demás secuestrados. Hacemos un llamado a los actuales cabecillas de las FARC para que no se hagan matar, liberen a los secuestrados y no sacrifiquen a sus hombres”, dijo Santos en la sede del ministerio de Defensa en Bogotá.

Santos explicó que los plagiados fueron liberados por medio de una operación de inteligencia llamada “Jaque”.

En la primera fase de la operación se ubicó la zona en la que se encontraban los secuestrados y los guerrilleros que los escoltaban gracias a la infiltración de la inteligencia colombiana en las FARC.

Las autoridades colombianas aseguraron que permitieron que la cuadrilla que llevaba a los ahora ex rehenes, huyeran, como gesto por la vida del resto de los secuestrados que permanecen con las FARC.

La liberación se produjo a 72 kilómetros de la ciudad de San José del Guaviare, capital departamental, en una operación realizada por un grupo élite de las fuerzas armadas colombianas, añadió el Ministro.

Betancourt fue secuestrada en 2002 por los rebeldes de la Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC) en momentos en que realizaba su campaña presidencial.

Por su parte los tres estadounidenses fueron secuestrados en febrero de 2003 cuando el avión en que realizaban tareas antidrogas en las selvas de Caquetá (sureste) cayó en un territorio bajo control rebelde.

Para entregar a un grupo de al menos 39 rehenes, entre ellos Betancourt y los tres estadounidenses, las FARC exigían la liberación de 500 rebeldes presos.

Los rescatados están siendo trasladados en estos momentos a la base militar de Tolemaida (centro).

Un funcionario del aeropuerto de San José del Guaviare dijo telefónicamente que vio a los rescatados cuando descendían de un helicóptero militar y abordaban un avión de la Fuerza Aérea.

Igor Labastida Calderón ex director de investigaciones de la Policía Federal Preventiva (PFP) y actual comandante de esa corporación, fue asesinado junto con su escolta José María Ochoa en una cocina económica denominada Anita, en calzada México-Tacuba, entre las calles Lago Argentina y Lago San Martín, colonia Argentina Antigua.

Labastida Calderón era un personaje cercano a Genaro García Luna, secretario de Seguridad Pública federal, con quien colaboró en varias ocasiones.

Otras tres personas fueron trasladadas a hospitales al resultar heridas durante la ráfaga que desconocidos efectuaron contra estas personas mientras se encontraban comiendo.

Entre los lesionados se encuentra Humberto Torres y Heidi Hasel Cruz Osorio, quienes fueron trasladados al hospital español

Otra de las personas que resultaron heridas, de nombre Álvaro Pérez Mendoza, presuntamente falleció al ser trasladado a la Cruz Roja; otra versión refiere que sigue vivo.

En el lugar se encuentran elementos de la Policía Federal Preventiva así como del agrupamiento Zorros de la Secretaria Pública del DF y peritos de la Procuraduría Capitalina quienes en estos momentos están llevando a cabo el levantamiento de los cuerpos que quedaron al interior de esta fonda.

Por cuestiones periciales las autoridades de la procuraduría bajaron las cortinas del local mientras una cantidad importante de curiosos se encuentran en las inmediaciones del lugar.

A pesar de ello aunque no se ha interrumpido la circulación sobre la calzada de México-Tacuba.

Sufrió Igor Labastida ataque hace cinco años en Cuautitlán Izcalli

En el año 2003 Igor Labastida Calderón, sufrió un atentado contra su vida en Cuautitlán Izcalli, cuando era Director de Asuntos Especiales de la AFI, al ser baleado la madrugada de ese sábado cuando se dirigía a su casa.

Fuentes de la PGR informaron que Labastida Calderón viajaba en su camioneta cuando detectó dos vehículos que organizaban arrancones en avenida Naucalpan, en la colonia Cumbria.

Al acercarse para ver qué pasaba, uno de los automovilistas sacó una pistola y le disparó, hiriéndolo en pierna y hombro.

Viajaba acompañado por Jesús Antonio Allende, también elemento de la AFI .

Gatilleros que viajaban en seis vehículos asesinaron a balazos con rifles “cuerno de chivo” anoche a cuatro personas en el poblado El Pozo, Imala.

Los sicarios además incendiaron dos casas y presuntamente levantaron a dos individuos que hasta el cierre de esta edición no se sabía de su paradero.

Los informes recabados en el sitio de la masacre indican que las víctimas son Édgar Milán Medina, de 19 años y su tío Pedro Milán Beltrán, de 40.

Ellos quedaron muertos en el porche de una casa.

Dentro de otra vivienda fue ejecutado Martín Félix Silva, de 55 años y en un callejón del pueblo mataron a José Ángel Tizoc Higuera, de 14.

El multihomicidio sucedió a las 20:20 horas.

Este hecho presuntamente tiene relación con otra masacre que sucedió en este mismo pueblo en Semana Santa.

Genaro Vizcarra Barraza, presunto integrante del cártel de Sinaloa, ingresó la madrugada de este miércoles a las instalaciones de la Subprocuraduría de Investigación Especializada en Delincuencia Organizada (Siedo) de la Procuraduría federal.

Vizcarra Barraza fue detenido la tarde del martes en Culiacán, Sinaloa, en posesión de 80 mil dólares y una pistola tipo escuadra.

El traslado se efectuó por 30 elementos de las Fuerzas Federales de Apoyo de la Policía Federal desde esa ciudad de Sinaloa hasta el hangar de la Procuraduría General de la República (PGR) en la Ciudad de México.

Ingresó a las 01:50 horas de este miércoles a la Siedo para rendir declaración ante el Ministerio Público de la Federación por los delitos de portación de arma de fuego de uso exclusivo de las fuerzas armadas de México y por el trasiego de 80 mil dólares.

Fuentes de la dependencia señalaron que el detenido es presunto integrante del cártel de Sinaloa y presumen que el dinero es producto del narcotráfico.

La violencia se ha acrecentado en aquella entidad debido a un pleito por la plaza entre, al menos dos poderosos grupos: El Cártel de Sinaloa y el del Golfo. Además se acusa al gobierno estatal de proteger a narcotraficantes. La semana pasada al Gobernador Eduardo Bours Castelo le entregaron una carta donde detallan el asesinato del periodista Alfredo Jiménez Mota, pero –en un estado controlado por el PRI– no hubo ninguna repercusión. No es miedo, es pavor, aseguran ciudadanos.

Sergio Haro Cordero

HERMOSILLO, Sonora.- El estado de Sonora se ha convertido en una especie de tierra de nadie, similar a la realidad de Baja California hace 20 años. Con un gobierno estatal priísta, autoritario, desacostumbrado a las críticas. Ese marco ha sido aprovechado por diversos grupos de narcotraficantes que han tomado estas tierras como propias, con la violencia en el día a día.

En noviembre 2007, un grupo de narcos atacaron la sede de policía en Cananea, asesinando a los agentes que estaban presentes. El Ejército fue tras ellos y al final sumaron 22 los muertos por el enfrentamiento. Apenas el fin de semana anterior en Cajeme se suscitó un enfrentamiento con saldo de tres policías muertos. Al día siguiente, militares detuvieron a un grupo fuertemente armado en Navojoa, cuando se disponían a abordar una avioneta. No solo traían un fuerte arsenal, además miles de dólares en efectivo.

“No hay miedo, hay pavor entre la población”, asume la diputada perredista Petra Santos, una de las escasas voces críticas que surgen en esta zona.

Un ejemplo de esto lo muestra Guillermo Noriega, dirigente de Sonora Ciudadana, un grupo civil que intenta la crítica en varios temas –transparencia, acceso a la información, libertad de expresión– pero en seguridad cierran la boca.

“Por seguridad, no hablamos de ese tema. Tomamos un acuerdo para restringir abordar el tema de seguridad, por obvias razones”, explica vía telefónica al tratar de concertar una entrevista.

De acuerdo a datos oficiales, en Sonora se registraron en 2007, 307 asesinatos –casi 100 más que en 2006– y hasta mayo de 2008 se contabilizaban 113.

Por su ubicación y el paso obligado por mar, tierra o aire sonorense, se menciona que al menos dos grupos se disputan esa plaza. Por un lado el Cártel de Sinaloa en presunta alianza con los de Juárez, y por el otro el Cártel del Golfo. En el enfrentamiento en Cananea incluso se mencionó la presencia de “Zetas”, ese grupo de ex militares considerados de los más sanguinarios en la guerra del narco.

Los periodistas no se han salvado de ese entorno de violencia. No sólo han sido reprimidos, ha habido amenazas, ataques a diarios, asesinatos y desapariciones. Como el caso del reportero del diario El Imparcial, Alfredo Jiménez Mota, desaparecido desde el sábado 2 de abril del 2005 y hasta la fecha no ha sido localizado.

En la segunda semana de junio, en una gira por Caborca, el Gobernador Eduardo Bours Castelo recibió de manos desconocidas un documento de nueve páginas escrito a mano. Ahí se detallaba el levantamiento y la ejecución del reportero sonorense a manos de un grupo de narcotraficantes que operaban en la entidad apoyados por –de acuerdo al documento– elementos de policías municipales y estatales, mencionados en colusión al actual Procurador del Estado de Sonora, Abel Murrieta, y al entonces Director de la Policía Ministerial, Roberto Tapia Chan.

La misma tarde de junio, Bours Castelo convocó de manera repentina a directores de medios de comunicación a quienes les informó lo sucedido e incluso les entregó una copia del documento recibido, aunque al día siguiente sólo dos medios publicaron la carta-denuncia.

El diario El Imparcial, donde laboraba Alfredo Jiménez Mota cuando fue desaparecido, solo publicó una pequeña nota sobre el tema en la página 3, en interiores.

En la carta entregada al Gobernador se narra con lujo de detalles cómo Alfredo Jiménez Mota fue “levantado” por un grupo de narcos –que encabezaba Raúl Enríquez Parra, alias “El Nueve” –. Al reportero, explican en la misiva, lo llevaron primero a una casa de seguridad con apoyo de elementos policíacos, también detallaron cómo fue torturado, trasladado luego en avioneta hasta Ciudad Obregón y en una casa del grupo, salvajemente interrogado hasta que decidieron matarlo.

“…luego el Montoyita le pegó un balazo en la nuca al periodista y lo sacamos, le echamos cal, le quitamos toda la ropa, quedó completamente desnudo. Nos retiramos, solo se quedaron en el lugar los de la PJE…”

Pero el documento incriminatorio no causó reacción alguna.

“No pasó nada, (con la carta) nada, nada. Aquí en Sonora hay un gran pavor de inmiscuirse”, refiere la legisladora Santos.

Referencia repetida
No es la primera vez que en el caso del periodista desaparecido se hace referencia al grupo de Raúl Enríquez Parra, quien encabezaba en Sonora un grupo dedicado al narcotráfico autodenominado “Los Números”.

En uno de los últimos reportajes de Jiménez Mota se detalló el funcionamiento de este grupo, ligado a los sinaloenses Beltrán Leyva, quienes a su vez eran identificados como operadores del Cártel de Sinaloa.

De acuerdo a un informe –aparentemente del Cisen– se ubica a los Beltrán Leyva como “Los tres Caballeros”, quienes se fortalecieron en Sonora a raíz del asesinato de Rodolfo García Gaxiola, alias El Chipilón”, un ex agente federal ligado al Cártel Arellano Félix.

De hecho la carta entregada al Gobernador Bours está firmada por Saúl García Gaxiola.

Raúl Enríquez Parra era parte de un grupo también de hermanos involucrados en actividades ilícitas y fue encontrado brutalmente asesinado en una zona rural de Navojoa junto con otros dos cuerpos, encobijados. Se presume que fueron arrojados desde una avioneta.

De acuerdo al reportaje firmado por Jiménez Mota, a grupo de Enríquez Parra se le atribuía cerca de 70 ejecuciones suscitadas durante el 2004.

En el caso de los hermanos Beltrán Leyva, Alfredo, alias “El Mochombo”, fue detenido en Sonora apenas el 21 de enero de este año. Otro grupo que pelea la plaza en Sonora es el conocido como “Los Salazar”, encabezados por Adán Salazar Zamorano.

ZETA publicó en febrero del 2006, un amplio reportaje firmado por Luis Arellano, donde se incluyó una versión retomada presuntamente de un informe del Cisen, donde se muestra la radiografía de estos grupos criminales, pero además, se mencionan a personajes como el actual Procurador Abel Murrieta y al entonces Director de la Policía Judicial del Estado, el sanluiseño Roberto Tapia Chan. De acuerdo a esa versión, la relación de los funcionarios venía desde que Ricardo Bours Castelo –hermano del actual Gobernador– fue alcalde en Cajeme, cuando Tapia Chan fue secretario de seguridad pública.

En el documento-informe se mencionó que a Tapia Chan se le vinculó con narcotraficantes desde 1991, cuando se desempeñaba como director de Averiguaciones Previas, involucrándosele en el extravío del expediente de Jaime González Gutiérrez, en ese entonces acusado de asesinar a un policía municipal en San Luis Río Colorado y luego señalado como el autor intelectual del asesinato del periodista sanluisino Benjamín Flores.

No es la primera ocasión que todos estos nombres son involucrados en la desaparición del periodista sonorense Jiménez Mota.

A mediados del 2005 dos hermanas, Johana y Elba Palma, de Ciudad Obregón, denunciaron que habían sido secuestradas; acusaron del plagio al grupo de Parra Enríquez y dijeron haber escuchado de sus captores los nombres de Jiménez Mota y Tapia Chan.

Otros trabajos periodísticos, como el de RioDoce en Culiacán, señaló estos nombres y estos vínculos. De acuerdo al periódico, en 2007 recibieron un documento donde les expusieron una versión similar, con datos semejantes y personajes parecidos. También el semanario Proceso en un reportaje publicado en febrero del 2007, mostró el testimonio de un informante que reveló datos coincidentes.

Bajo ese fundamento, un sector de la prensa sonorense se ha mostrado cauteloso con el reciente documento entregado al Gobernador Bours.

Escribir con miedo
Después de la desaparición de Alfredo Jiménez en abril del 2005, el diarioEl Imparcial tomó una serie de medidas, como el restringir la publicación de investigaciones sobre el narcotráfico, limitándose a difundir datos aportados desde diversas corporaciones públicas. También elaboraron una política de trabajo que tiene que ver con la protección a los reporteros de esa casa editora. La sede de periódicos Healy que en Tijuana publicaFrontera y en Mexicali La Crónica, dotaron a reporteros y fotógrafos de chalecos antibalas.

Desde su silla de Director Editorial del diario El Expresso, Martín Holguín comentó cómo fueron convocados de urgencia la tarde del lunes 10 a una reunión con el gobernador Bours Castelo.

Ahí se les explicó lo sucedido y se les entregó una copia de la carta-denuncia.

Al día siguiente, sólo El Expresso y el diario Critica publicaron íntegro el documento.

“Nosotros decidimos publicarla porque consideramos que era de alto interés para la gente saber lo que decía esa carta”, expone Holguín y según su versión, el Gobernador les dijo que éste podría ser el inicio de una campaña más en su contra.

“La sociedad no reaccionó, no dijo nada, la sociedad supo de la carta pero no hubo grandes reacciones”, explica el director de El Expresso y amplió:

“Es una situación delicada, pero también es mucho dimes y diretes, mucho chisme. Yo en lo personal no le hago mucho caso a esos comunicados.”

–Pero ustedes lo publicaron…

“Lo publicamos porque creo que era importante, él (Gobernador) dice que le están armando una campaña y aquí está lo que dicen…”

Sobre el tema de la cobertura del narcotráfico, Martín Holguín explicó: “Es un tema complicado eso del narco, tratarlo es un tema complicado, tanto como meterse a investigar; no. Creo que es función de la autoridad, nosotros publicamos los resultados que ellos tienen…”.

Más aún, se sinceró:

“Mira, nosotros no vamos a llegar a nada y solamente ponemos en riesgo a los reporteros. Publicamos lo que las autoridades investigan.”

Las voces civiles son escasas. Una de ellas es la de Othoniel Ramírez, quien encabeza un organismo civil denominado Tribunal Ciudadano.

“No hay muchos grupos ciudadanos independientes, la mayoría empiezan simulando que son ciudadanos y agarran cierto auge y luego caen en las redes de la corrupción”, dijo de entrada.

Se le pone el ejemplo de los empresarios, que en otros lares son voces críticas, pero no aquí en Sonora: “Aquí están muy solidarizados con el poder que es muy generoso con ellos, les concede todo, es a los que sí escucha, que sí atiende”.

Sobre el tema de la inseguridad, Ramírez analizó:

“Se ha venido agudizando y cada vez se ha venido convirtiendo, de un espacio tranquilo, en un estado riesgoso ya por los grupos delictivos que se han establecido en nuestro estado. Y como dicen los medios nacionales, están recibiendo respaldo del gobierno, hay relaciones ya expuestas a nivel nacional de este gobierno con grupos delictuosos, con el narco específicamente“.

El integrante de Tribunal Ciudadano califica de hábil la medida tomada por Bours y su equipo de dar a conocer el documento antes de que saliera por otro lado. Y sobre los señalamientos, coincide, no es la primera vez que emergen éstos, con los mismos nombres.

“Y es que aquí llegamos a un estado de incredulidad en la aplicación de la justicia, ya sabemos que los enemigos de la sociedad y del ciudadano, la amenaza número uno son los grupos policíacos y los de procuración de justicia“.

La otra parte tiene que ver con la respuesta represiva a lo que han sido varios movimientos sociales, como la de los choferes encarcelados o grupos ecologistas que se han opuesto a un proyecto en la zona conocida como Villa Seri. Y sobre la prensa local, finalmente opinó:

“Hay un control muy estricto de la prensa aquí en la capital, el único medio que le hace contrapeso es El Imparcial, de ahí en fuera los otros están, en su inmensa mayoría, están recibiendo subsidios y mochadas y son sus adoradores…”

Miedo no, pavor
De los 33 diputados locales, el PRD ocupa tres escaños, uno de ellos el de la diputada sonorense Petra Santos, quien considera que hay un gran temor entre la población, dividido entre el miedo a los narcos y al gobierno.

Mencionó hechos violentos como el sucedido en Cananea en noviembre 2007, y otros que se han venido sucediendo, contra la versión del Procurador que dice que todo está bien.

“ Se ha desatado más la corrupción, se ha desatado más el control de los grupos y aquí en Sonora, gente que se atreve a denunciar, periodistas, los vemos que los matan, o los desaparecen que es lo mismo. Como el caso de Alfredo que tiene mil y tantos días y no se sabe nada.

Sobre la carta-denuncia, comentó:

“Se dijo que habían intervenido personajes, yo no puedo asegurarte, que participaron muchas gentes que están ahora en el gabinete de Bours, se ha señalado mucho al Procurador, al hermano, sin tener las pruebas es arriesgado de mi parte decirte, pero esto es una vox populi..”

La diputada perredista insistió en que debe investigarse toda esta situación y sobre la violencia, aunque dice que a veces baja, ha habido meses que en Sonora han estado “como en Tijuana y Mexicali.”

De las escasas voces exigentes, mencionó el ejemplo de los empresarios, quienes sólo reclamaron cuando a varios de ellos les secuestraron a sus hijos, pero hasta ahí.

“Aquí no se han llegado a los niveles como Baja California, Sinaloa, pero no quiere decir que estén bajos esos niveles. Aquí en Sonora hay un gran pavor de inmiscuirse, ni con narcos ni con el gobierno.”

Tijuana, Baja California, 62 individuos en posesión de armas, equipo de comunicación, chalecos antibalas, droga y uniformes de diferentes corporaciones, fueron capturados por soldados y elementos de la PEP, en una operación de inteligencia realizada contra del crimen organizado, cuando todos estaban en una fiesta de bautizo en la colonia Herrera.



Agentes de la Policía Estatal Preventiva acudieron junto con personal de la Secretaría de la Defensa Nacional siendo las nueve de la noche al salón de fiestas “El Pequeño Travieso”, ubicado en la calle Esteritos, en se encontraban miembros del crimen organizado y su personal de seguridad, además de personas vinculadas con sus actividades ilícitas, por lo que se efectuó la operación de aseguramiento.La sorpresa fue total y nadie pudo utilizar las 19 armas entre rifles y pistola que traían, más de 5, mil cartuchos, chalecos antibalas, radios con frecuencias policíacas, uniformes de distintas corporaciones, celulares y hasta droga.



Los Detenidos:

1.- Jesús Esteban Sánchez Robles, 27 años, Tijuana. B.C.

2.- Marco Antonio Álvarez Castro, 27 años, La Paz, BCS

3.- José Gilberto Zepeda Parra, 40 años, Tijuana, BC

4.- Enrique Silva Pérez, 36 años, Tijuana, BC (022)

5.- Carlos Acosta Zataray, 28 años, Mazatlán, Sin

6.- Ramón Alberto Tirado Sánchez, 24 años, Mazatlán, Sin.

7.- Luis Fernando Llanes Lozoya, 43 años, Mocorito, Sin.

8.- Antonio Lizárraga Ruelas, 33 años, Mazatlán, Sin.

9.- Ernesto Llamas Llamas, 26 años, Guanajuato, Gto.

10.- Víctor Hugo León Quiroz, 37 años, Tijuana, BC

11.- Cipriano Llanes González, 31 años, Mocorito, Sin.

12.- Carlos Lozano Calzada, 39 años, Tijuana, BC

13.- Mario Sanabria Meza, 35 años, Tijuana, BC

14.- Alberto Rojas Estrada, 34 años, Tijuana, BC

15.- Juan Carlos Contreras Martínez, 34 años, Tijuana, BC

16.- Francisco Javier César Moreno, 38 años, Mexicali, BC

17.- Cristian Jesús Rojas Gutiérrez, 25 años, Mazatlán, Sin.

18.- Salomón Alcázar González, 34 años, Aguililla, Mich.

19.- Juan José Pacheco Morán, 20 años, Tijuana, BC

20.- Fabián Delgadillo Hernández, 30 años, Villa Hidalgo, Nay.

21.- Miguel Ángel Alfaro Pulido, 36 años, Guadalajara, Jal.

22.- Antonio Rodríguez, 25 años, San Diego, Cal. EEUU

23.- Ángel Camacho Partida, 17 años, Tijuana, BC

24.- Miguel Calderón Lozano, 38 años, Uruapan, Mich.

25.- Javier Gurrola Cardozo, 31 años, Tijuana, BC

26.- Rubén Tinoco Mendoza, 23 años, Tijuana, BC

27.- Francisco Javier Ayón Rodríguez, 36 años, Tijuana, BC

28.- Rogelio Ruth Colorado, 41, Veracruz, Ver.

29.- Leopoldo David Echevarría Acosto, 27 años, Tijuana, BC

30.- Miguel Alfonso Franco Pérez, 30 años, Morelia, Mich.

31.- Julio César Mancero Losal, 23 años, Tijuana, BC

32.- Leobardo Llanes Leyva, 44 años, Mocorito, Sin.

33.- Rubén Guillermo Llanes Leyva, 57 años, Mocorito, Sin.

34.- Rubén Ramírez Valencia, 21 años, Guadalajara, Jal.

35.- Francisco Mendoza Reynaga, 44 años, Mazatlán, Sin.

36.- Ernesto Tiscareño Astorga, 34 años, Tijuana, BC

37.- Alejandro Altamirano Gómez, 20 años, Tijuana, BC

38.- Manuel Armando Valerio Juárez, 30 años, Distrito Federal

39.- Raúl Antonio Joaquín Ramírez, 20 años, Tijuana, BC

40.- Ramón Eduardo Gómez Quijano, 22 años, Huatabampo, Son.

41.- Daniel Ezequiel Cázares Rodríguez, 19 años, Tijuana, BC

42.- Miguel Ángel Rodríguez Méndez, 30 años, Tijuana, BC

43.- José Ramón Ledezma Rodríguez, 25 años, Dimas San Ignacio, Sin.

44.- Ernesto Daniel Alfaro Pulido, 37 años, Tijuana, BC

45.- Jesús Isabel Morales Gómez, 19 años, Tijuana, BC

46.- Cristian Jesús Sotelo Mendoza, 23 años, Mazatlán, Sin.

47.- Cristian Alejandro Estrada Romero, 20 años, Tijuana, BC

48.- Mario Alberto Rodríguez Meza, 24 años, Tijuana, BC

49.- Adolfo de la Paz Ortega, 41 años, San Diego, Cal., EEUU

50.- Fernando Arturo Bolaños Ayala, 30 años, Tijuana, BC

51.- Adán Zermeño Domínguez, 54 años, Tijuana, BC

52.- Germán Tiscareño Astorga, 31 años, Tijuana, BC

53.- Ramón Paz López García, 38 años, La Paz, BCS

54.- Gilberto Llanes Lozoya, 39 años, Mocorito, Sin.

55.- Emeterio Tomás Rojas Mendoza, 28 años, El Rosario, Sin.

56.- Juan Ruiz Hernández

57.- Marcos Soriano Briceño

58.- Martín Ramón Torres Garibay

59.- Jorge Abel Haro Jara

60.-José Rodríguez Gamez, de 60 años de edad.

61.-Jorge Venegas Osuna, de 28 años de edad.

Tijuana, Baja California, 62 individuos en posesión de armas, equipo de comunicación, chalecos antibalas, droga y uniformes de diferentes corporaciones, fueron capturados por soldados y elementos de la PEP, en una operación de inteligencia realizada contra del crimen organizado, cuando todos estaban en una fiesta de bautizo en la colonia Herrera.

Agentes de la Policía Estatal Preventiva acudieron junto con personal de la Secretaría de la Defensa Nacional siendo las nueve de la noche al salón de fiestas “El Pequeño Travieso”, ubicado en la calle Esteritos, en se encontraban miembros del crimen organizado y su personal de seguridad, además de personas vinculadas con sus actividades ilícitas, por lo que se efectuó la operación de aseguramiento.La sorpresa fue total y nadie pudo utilizar las 19 armas entre rifles y pistola que traían, más de 5, mil cartuchos, chalecos antibalas, radios con frecuencias policíacas, uniformes de distintas corporaciones, celulares y hasta droga.

Los Detenidos:

1.- Jesús Esteban Sánchez Robles, 27 años, Tijuana. B.C.

2.- Marco Antonio Álvarez Castro, 27 años, La Paz, BCS

3.- José Gilberto Zepeda Parra, 40 años, Tijuana, BC

4.- Enrique Silva Pérez, 36 años, Tijuana, BC (022)

5.- Carlos Acosta Zataray, 28 años, Mazatlán, Sin

6.- Ramón Alberto Tirado Sánchez, 24 años, Mazatlán, Sin.

7.- Luis Fernando Llanes Lozoya, 43 años, Mocorito, Sin.

8.- Antonio Lizárraga Ruelas, 33 años, Mazatlán, Sin.

9.- Ernesto Llamas Llamas, 26 años, Guanajuato, Gto.

10.- Víctor Hugo León Quiroz, 37 años, Tijuana, BC

11.- Cipriano Llanes González, 31 años, Mocorito, Sin.

12.- Carlos Lozano Calzada, 39 años, Tijuana, BC

13.- Mario Sanabria Meza, 35 años, Tijuana, BC

14.- Alberto Rojas Estrada, 34 años, Tijuana, BC

15.- Juan Carlos Contreras Martínez, 34 años, Tijuana, BC

16.- Francisco Javier César Moreno, 38 años, Mexicali, BC

17.- Cristian Jesús Rojas Gutiérrez, 25 años, Mazatlán, Sin.

18.- Salomón Alcázar González, 34 años, Aguililla, Mich.

19.- Juan José Pacheco Morán, 20 años, Tijuana, BC

20.- Fabián Delgadillo Hernández, 30 años, Villa Hidalgo, Nay.

21.- Miguel Ángel Alfaro Pulido, 36 años, Guadalajara, Jal.

22.- Antonio Rodríguez, 25 años, San Diego, Cal. EEUU

23.- Ángel Camacho Partida, 17 años, Tijuana, BC

24.- Miguel Calderón Lozano, 38 años, Uruapan, Mich.

25.- Javier Gurrola Cardozo, 31 años, Tijuana, BC

26.- Rubén Tinoco Mendoza, 23 años, Tijuana, BC

27.- Francisco Javier Ayón Rodríguez, 36 años, Tijuana, BC

28.- Rogelio Ruth Colorado, 41, Veracruz, Ver.

29.- Leopoldo David Echevarría Acosto, 27 años, Tijuana, BC

30.- Miguel Alfonso Franco Pérez, 30 años, Morelia, Mich.

31.- Julio César Mancero Losal, 23 años, Tijuana, BC

32.- Leobardo Llanes Leyva, 44 años, Mocorito, Sin.

33.- Rubén Guillermo Llanes Leyva, 57 años, Mocorito, Sin.

34.- Rubén Ramírez Valencia, 21 años, Guadalajara, Jal.

35.- Francisco Mendoza Reynaga, 44 años, Mazatlán, Sin.

36.- Ernesto Tiscareño Astorga, 34 años, Tijuana, BC

37.- Alejandro Altamirano Gómez, 20 años, Tijuana, BC

38.- Manuel Armando Valerio Juárez, 30 años, Distrito Federal

39.- Raúl Antonio Joaquín Ramírez, 20 años, Tijuana, BC

40.- Ramón Eduardo Gómez Quijano, 22 años, Huatabampo, Son.

41.- Daniel Ezequiel Cázares Rodríguez, 19 años, Tijuana, BC

42.- Miguel Ángel Rodríguez Méndez, 30 años, Tijuana, BC

43.- José Ramón Ledezma Rodríguez, 25 años, Dimas San Ignacio, Sin.

44.- Ernesto Daniel Alfaro Pulido, 37 años, Tijuana, BC

45.- Jesús Isabel Morales Gómez, 19 años, Tijuana, BC

46.- Cristian Jesús Sotelo Mendoza, 23 años, Mazatlán, Sin.

47.- Cristian Alejandro Estrada Romero, 20 años, Tijuana, BC

48.- Mario Alberto Rodríguez Meza, 24 años, Tijuana, BC

49.- Adolfo de la Paz Ortega, 41 años, San Diego, Cal., EEUU

50.- Fernando Arturo Bolaños Ayala, 30 años, Tijuana, BC

51.- Adán Zermeño Domínguez, 54 años, Tijuana, BC

52.- Germán Tiscareño Astorga, 31 años, Tijuana, BC

53.- Ramón Paz López García, 38 años, La Paz, BCS

54.- Gilberto Llanes Lozoya, 39 años, Mocorito, Sin.

55.- Emeterio Tomás Rojas Mendoza, 28 años, El Rosario, Sin.

56.- Juan Ruiz Hernández

57.- Marcos Soriano Briceño

58.- Martín Ramón Torres Garibay

59.- Jorge Abel Haro Jara

60.-José Rodríguez Gamez, de 60 años de edad.

61.-Jorge Venegas Osuna, de 28 años de edad.